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EDITORIAL
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 26  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 43

How to calculate journal impact factor?


Department of Plastic, Reconstructive, Aesthetic, and Hand Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Dokuz Eylul University, Inciralti, Izmir, Turkey

Date of Web Publication13-Apr-2018

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Cenk Demirdover
Department of Plastic, Reconstructive, Aesthetic, and Hand Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Dokuz Eylul University, Inciralti, Izmir 35340
Turkey
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1300-6878.230148

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How to cite this article:
Demirdover C. How to calculate journal impact factor?. Turk J Plast Surg 2018;26:43

How to cite this URL:
Demirdover C. How to calculate journal impact factor?. Turk J Plast Surg [serial online] 2018 [cited 2018 Apr 19];26:43. Available from: http://www.turkjplastsurg.org/text.asp?2018/26/2/43/230148



Dear Colleagues,

In the last decade, the number of scientific journals, as well as the number of published articles has been increased. When we consider that all submitted articles are not getting accepted, we can realize this exponential growth. In order to measure the quality of a scientific journal, several methods have been proposed. Impact factor (IF) is the most common way to measure the popularity of a journal.

To understand IF, first, we have to look at the formula based on this system. IF is related to the frequency with which the “average article” in a journal has been cited in a given period of time.



IF can be better understood with an example. The IF of a specific journal for the year 2016 can be calculated by dividing the sum of the number of the citations received in 2014 and 2015 to the number of the articles published in 2014 and 2015. For example, imagine that total number of a journal's published articles in 2014 and 2015 is 40. If the sum of the number of the citations received in 2014 and 2015 for these articles is 60, then the IF of this journal for 2016 is 1.5 (60/40 = 1.5).

In order to calculate the revised IF, one should subtract the total number of self-citations from the total citations and then divide again the number of the articles published in this period.

Sometimes calculating IF for longer periods might give a better idea for the readers. Then, a calculation of a 5-year period is called “5-year IF.”

As you can see from the formula, there are two major components: the number of citations and the number of published articles. One should not think that if the number of published articles decreases, then the IF would be increased. This might be a true approach in mathematics; however, we should always keep in mind that an article with a good quality gets more citations.

As a conclusion, we have to do our best when writing an article. If we publish a high-quality article, citations will certainly come after. Our motto should be: Publishing for science, not for statistics!






 

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